>revolutionize transportation, perhaps even bringing us gravifugal flying crafts, and shape world events (link via The Sound and the Fury ) and if the mention of Nazi superscience and UFOs doesn’t make you think of respectable physicists, you may want to reconsider. Overturning physics is serious business, and Roger Babson was a serious man. Trained as an engineer at M.I.T., Babson instead went into finance, and founded (among other things) the National Quotation Board. Babson predicted the stock market crash of 1929 and amassed a fortune, which he sought to use in ways that would better America. A church-going teatotaler, he ran for president on the Prohibitionist Party ticket. He founded Babson College in Massachusetts and Webber College in Florida. And he founded the Gravity Research Foundation. Today, alas, Babson’s foundation has been taken over by unserious people, men and women who do not appreciate the threat of "Gravity — Our Enemy No. 1." The Foundation gives an annual prize; these days it is won by physicists like Stephen Hawking and George Smoot. These are serious physicists, but they do not burn with desire to protect people from the risks of gravity (Babson’s obsession was born of personal tragedy; his sister drowned and his son died in a plane crash), much less see humanity reach the stars thanks to gravity shield technology. The only real legacy of Babson’s selfless desire to conquer gravity are a few monuments such as Colby University’s Anti-Gravity Stone. It reads:

This monument has been
erected by the
Gravity Research Foundation
Roger W. Babson founder

It is to remind students of
the blessings forthcoming
when a semi-insulator is
discovered in order to harness
gravity as a free power
and reduce airplane accidents
 1960

The university moved the monument, as drunken Colby students continuously knocked it over. College students are not serious people, but they understand falling down.

Eugene Podkletnov is a Russian materials scientist who claims to have discovered a gravity shield. An article he published in a peer-reviewed physics journal claimed that items suspended over his device — a series of rotating superconducting discs — lost a measurable amount of weight. Serious scientists, people who work for places like NASA and Boeing (which denies everything, a clear sign that something’s afoot) investigated his claims. Alas, they were unable to reproduce them. But if you’re not convinced that this amazing scientific breakthrough will revolutionize transportation, perhaps even bringing us gravifugal flying crafts, and shape world events (link via The Sound and the Fury ) and if the mention of Nazi superscience and UFOs doesn’t make you think of respectable physicists, you may want to reconsider. Overturning physics is serious business, and Roger Babson was a serious man. Trained as an engineer at M.I.T., Babson instead went into finance, and founded (among other things) the National Quotation Board. Babson predicted the stock market crash of 1929 and amassed a fortune, which he sought to use in ways that would better America. A church-going teatotaler, he ran for president on the Prohibitionist Party ticket. He founded Babson College in Massachusetts and Webber College in Florida. And he founded the Gravity Research Foundation. Today, alas, Babson’s foundation has been taken over by unserious people, men and women who do not appreciate the threat of "Gravity — Our Enemy No. 1." The Foundation gives an annual prize; these days it is won by physicists like Stephen Hawking and George Smoot. These are serious physicists, but they do not burn with desire to protect people from the risks of gravity (Babson’s obsession was born of personal tragedy; his sister drowned and his son died in a plane crash), much less see humanity reach the stars thanks to gravity shield technology. The only real legacy of Babson’s selfless desire to conquer gravity are a few monuments such as Colby University’s Anti-Gravity Stone. It reads:

This monument has been
erected by the
Gravity Research Foundation
Roger W. Babson founder

It is to remind students of
the blessings forthcoming
when a semi-insulator is
discovered in order to harness
gravity as a free power
and reduce airplane accidents
 1960

The university moved the monument, as drunken Colby students continuously knocked it over. College students are not serious people, but they understand falling down.