Meanwhile, this generation’s Will Rogers, Warren Buffett, has written an editorial calling for campaign finance reform: “The way to enshrine free speech is not to give each candidate a soapbox and a megaphone. Rather, we should require broadcast stations — beneficiaries of incredibly valuable licenses, courtesy of your government — to make available, prior to every election, modest amounts of time for political discourse. Let’s add an ability to be heard to a right to speak.” Nobody would listen to a populist lariat-twirler in the year 2001, so I suppose that (as with the William Gates-backed efforts to prevent repeal of the inheritance tax) we’ve got to rely on people with huge amounts of wealth to get the word out. Buffett doesn’t say anything too shocking here, but as in much of his writing, he’s droll and sensible. Makes me want to go eat a Dilly Bar and watch real reform get stopped dead on C-SPAN. Even if McCain-Feingold passes, I’m sure new and exciting loopholes will be found, and a few springs from now the same debate, with new names and new players, will be playing itself out again.

Lhude sing cuccu!

Well, spring has officially arrived. Bring on the accoutrements: cherry blossoms, baby peas, the Sweet Sixteen, Cadbury Eggs, campaign-finance reform struggles in Congress. The farmer’s market should be opening soon, which is absolutely delightful; cabbage, root vegetables, eggplant, and squash are all lovely things, but I’m craving some variety in my fresh produce, thank you very much. Soon there will be all sorts of lovely vegetables to experiment with.

Meanwhile, this generation’s Will Rogers, Warren Buffett, has written an editorial calling for campaign finance reform: “The way to enshrine free speech is not to give each candidate a soapbox and a megaphone. Rather, we should require broadcast stations — beneficiaries of incredibly valuable licenses, courtesy of your government — to make available, prior to every election, modest amounts of time for political discourse. Let’s add an ability to be heard to a right to speak.” Nobody would listen to a populist lariat-twirler in the year 2001, so I suppose that (as with the William Gates-backed efforts to prevent repeal of the inheritance tax) we’ve got to rely on people with huge amounts of wealth to get the word out. Buffett doesn’t say anything too shocking here, but as in much of his writing, he’s droll and sensible. Makes me want to go eat a Dilly Bar and watch real reform get stopped dead on C-SPAN. Even if McCain-Feingold passes, I’m sure new and exciting loopholes will be found, and a few springs from now the same debate, with new names and new players, will be playing itself out again.

Lhude sing cuccu! None